Population : 8,427

Llanilltud Fawr

Llantwit Major

Population : 8,427

Place Description

An ancient town steeped in Welsh history, Llantwit Major and was once a place of learning for Welsh saints. The first Christian settlements were established by missionaries who travelled through the Celtic fringes of Wales, Ireland, Cornwall and Brittany. The most important of these settlements was at Llantwit Major, where St Illtud founded a church and religious school in around 5ooAD: Britain’s oldest centre of learning! Llantwit became a sacred and special place. The imposing church of St Illtud now stands on the site and, thanks to support from the Heritage Lottery Fund, the ruined Galilee Chapel has been restored and houses an exhibition of Celtic crosses and carved stones. Llantwit Major sits at the centre of the Glamorgan Heritage Coast. A coastal path runs along the cliff tops, joining the narrow valleys that lead down to the sea.

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Category Description

This is a small town or neighbourhood in category 1. These towns or neighbourhoods tend to have higher proportions of married households and fewer single occupancy households than Wales as a whole. They tend to have slightly higher proportions of home ownership and lower levels of social rented homes. There tends to be more people in work and in full-time employment than the Welsh average and people tend to be more qualified with a larger proportion of people with degrees and fewer people with no qualifications. More people are in professional and managerial positions than in other places in Wales and multiple car ownership is higher. Proportionally, slightly more people in these places were born in Wales and more people identify as having Welsh nationality. The proportion of Welsh speaking residents also tends to be slightly higher.

Our place categorisation is : Category 1

Our inter-relationship assessment is :

Please see the methodology page for more detail.

Community Assets

Population Flow Maps and Graphical Summaries

Flow maps show the movement, or flow, of people between two places. Our flow maps contain information on commuters, migration and daily trips. Graphical summaries provide an overview of the percentage of people who commute or have migrated between different types of places. Use the toggle to switch between flows, maps and graphical summaries.

The maps show significant flows of people between the selected place and other places. Flows in and out of the selected place and each other place have been added together to make a total flow for each pair of places. The top 20 total flows have been mapped for each place. Warm colours (for example, orange) indicate that more people are moving into a place, whereas cold colours (for example, blue) indicate that more people are moving out of a place.

The size of each flow is proportional to the thickness of the lines. Inflows and outflows are not distinguished and are added together to calculate the total flow size. Counts and percentages of the inflows and outflows, for each flow line, can be seen by clicking on the corresponding flow line.

Graphical summaries categorise the places where people commute or move from / to according to whether they are a place in the same local authority as the selected place, or a place in a different local authority to the selected place, or whether they are places in England (either an English border authority or an English Region). These includes places with fewer than 2000 people, and therefore so represent the total numbers of commuters or migrants. Graphical summaries are not available for Daily Flows data.

The flow data is for England and Wales only. Sections highlighted with blue borders indicate new data, features or functions added in the most recent update.

Select between displaying the map of flows, or the graphical summary of flows. Commuting data is taken from the Census 2011 and is based on all usual residents ages 16 and over in employment the week before the census (20 March 2011). Please see the methodology page for more detail about the variables and data sources.

The lines display the total numbers and percentages of commuters travelling between the selected place and other places with a population above 2000 people, within Wales and England.

The end of each line is the centre of the destination. In Wales these will be the centres of the CBUAs. In England these will be the centres of English border authorities or English regions. Hence care needs to be used when interpreting the maps as the end point could represent commuters travelling across a very large area and who live or work closer to the selected place than the line immediately suggests.

Flows with fewer than 3 commuters have been suppressed to maintain anonymity. To increase the clarity of the map only the top 20 flows are displayed.

The thickness of the line denotes the relative proportion of commuters.

Hover over a line to display a summary of the number of commuters between the two places. The destination is given at the top of the pop-up box together with the total number of commuters. The rank gives the relative importance of the flow for the selected place.

There are two radial graphs summarising commuting into, out of, or within the selected place. Each graph displays data relating to commuting flows in the form of a circle, with the axes of the graph representing each commuting flow variable. All the variables are shown as percentages, so the further along the axis the variable falls, the higher the percentage. The left-hand graph represents the workplace destinations of the commuters who live in the selected place, and this includes people who work from home, people who commute to work within the selected place, and people who commute to work outside of the selected place. The right-hand graph represents the home locations of the people who commute to work into the selected place from elsewhere.

The blue line represents the place shown in the graph's title. The red line represents the average for Wales.

Hover over a point on the axis to show the actual percentage for each variable.

Living in: Llantwit Major

Living outside: Llantwit Major

People who live within Llantwit Major and commute to:

People who live outside Llantwit Major and commute in from:

Select between displaying the map of flows, or the graphical summary of flows. Migration data is taken from the Census 2011 and is based on all usual residents who were living at a different address one year earlier (27 March 2010). Please see the methodology page for more detail about the variables and data sources.

The lines display the total numbers and percentages of migrants travelling between the selected place and other places with a population above 2000 people, within Wales and England.

The end of each line is the centre of the destination. In Wales these will be the centres of the CBUAs. In England these will be the centres of English border authorities or English regions. Hence care needs to be used when interpreting the maps as the end point could represent people migrating across a very large area and who have moved shorter distances than the line immediately suggests.

Flows with fewer than 3 migrants have been suppressed to maintain anonymity. To increase the clarity of the map only the top 20 flows are displayed.

The thickness of the line denotes the relative proportion of migrants.

Hover over a line to display a summary of the number of migrants between the two places. The destination is given at the top of the pop-up box together with the total number of migrants. The rank gives the relative importance of the flow for the selected place.

There are two radial graphs summarising migration into, out of, or within the selected place. Each graph displays data relating to migration flows in the form of a circle, with the axes of the graph representing each migration flow variable. All the variables are shown as percentages, so the further along the axis the variable falls, the higher the percentage. The left-hand graph represents the destinations of the migrants who lived in the selected place, and this includes people who moved within the selected place, and people who moved outside of the selected place. The right-hand graph represents the locations of the people who moved into the selected place from elsewhere.

The blue line represents the place shown in the graph's title. The red line represents the average for Wales.

Hover over a point on the axis to show the actual percentage for each variable.

Lived in: Llantwit Major

Lived outside: Llantwit Major

People who lived within Llantwit Major and moved to:

People who lived outside Llantwit Major and moved in from:

The lines display the modelled number of trips between the selected place and other places with a population above 2000 people within Wales and England. Trips can be filtered by mode of transport, the time of day and the day of the week. Please see the methodology page for more detail about the variables and data sources.

The end of each line is the centre of the destination. In Wales these will be the centres of the CBUAs. In England these will be the centres of English border authorities or English regions. Hence care needs to be used when interpreting the maps as the end point could represent people travelling across a very large area and who have travelled shorter distances than the line immediately suggests.

Flows with fewer than 10 trips have been suppressed to maintain anonymity. To increase the clarity of the map only the top 20 flows are displayed.

The thickness of the line denotes the relative proportion of trips.

Hover over a line to display a modelled of the number of trips between the two places. The destination is given at the top of the pop-up box together with the total number of trips. The rank gives the relative importance of the flow for the selected place.

Select a mode of transport:

Select a time of week:

Select a time of day:

Connectivity

Connectivity displays maps of how different places in Wales with a population over 2000 people are connected by the road and rail network. The purpose is to give an overall sense of the ability to travel from one place to another by private (car) or public (rail) transport. We aim to eventually include connectivity by bus – this is an ongoing project due to the complexity of the data.

Please see the methodology page for more detail about the variables and data sources.

Connectivity by car maps travel distance (kilometres) and travel time (minutes) from the centre of the select place outwards along the road network. There are various caveats in deciding the route taken and the calculation of travel times which are outlined in the methodology. The resulting maps depict buffer zones for 5km, 10km, 20km and 30km travel distances and 10 min, 20 min and 30 min travel times from the centre of the place. The boundaries of the zones are dashed indicating that they are indicative of how far a person could travel and that there is an element of uncertainty depending on time of day, day of the week, weather conditions etc. So please bear this in mind when interpreting the maps.

Travel Distance

Travel Time

Connectivity by train summarises some key metrics relating to the accessibility of railway stations in Wales and along the border in England to the selected place and some of their characteristics. It also includes a map of the nearest stations to the selected place.

Station metrics include the closest three stations to the selected place in terms of travel distance (in kilometres) and travel time (in minutes) by private transport. If a place has more than three stations, then the stations with the highest daily passenger usage are shown. It shows the station’s average daily passenger numbers to give an indication of its importance (and hence level of service), the number of different train routes and lines served by the station, whether a line is on a direct route to an airport or ferry terminal (direct transport connection / type of connection), and whether it is a request stop. It also has some information on facilities and a disability accessibility classification. The latter uses a classification made available by Transport for Wales and the detailed definitions can be found on the methodology page.

Briefly, Category A - The station has step-free access to and between all platforms via level access, lifts or ramps; Category B - The station does not meet category A, but has step-free access to either all platforms or at least one platform; Category B1 - step-free access to all platforms and may include long or steep ramps. Access between platforms may be via the street; Category B2 - Some step-free access to all platforms, but major barriers exist which are likely to restrict the ability of some people to use the station; Category B3 - Some step-free access, may be in one direction only and not to all platforms.

Information about station facilities and accessibility is indicative only. Those wishing to utilise these facilities should check with the station’s operator or website prior to travelling.

Closest three stations:

Locations of nearest stations to selected place, including the closest three stations.

Inter-relationships - how does this place compare to others similar to it?

Our inter-relationship assessment explores the assets and relationships which places have between the public, commercial, and social sectors. It gives an indication of the extent to which places are reliant or otherwise upon other places in Wales for these assets and relationships.

A dependent place will on average have a low number of public, commercial, and social economy assets in relation to its population. An independent place will on average have a high number of public, commercial, and social economy assets in relation to its population. An interdependent place will sit somewhere between independent and dependent places.

Please see the methodology page for more detail about the variables and data sources

Hover over the graph to expand the display when comparing two or more places.

The bold circle on the graph is your chosen place

The grey bar is the average for similar sized places in the same Category as your chosen place.

The red bar is the Welsh average.

The interactive graph displays the inter-relationships for the places you have selected by public, commercial, and social assets, such as schools, hospitals and shops.

Places to the left of the graph are more dependent on other places for the particular asset.

Places to the right of the graph are more independent for the particular asset.

This gives you an idea of how independent or otherwise a place is compared to other places in Wales over 2000 people.

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Radial Graphs

A radial graph displays data for a series of variables relating to a particular theme in the form of a circle, with the axes of the graph representing each variable. All the variables are shown as percentages, so the further along the axis the variable falls, the higher the percentage.

Please see the methodology page for more detail about the variables and data sources